Search…
⌃K
Links

Routing Lifecycle

The routing lifecycle allows you to run code at different points of the routing lifecycle such as fetching data or changing the UI.
Inside your routable components which implement the IRouteViewModel interface, certain methods are called at different points of the routing lifecycle. These lifecycle hooks allow you to run code inside of your components, such as fetching data or changing the UI itself.
Router lifecycle hook methods are all completely optional. You only have to implement the methods you require. The router will only call a method if it has been specified inside of your routable component. All lifecycle hook methods also support returning a promise and can be asynchronous.
If you are working with components you are rendering, implementing IRouteViewModel will ensure that your code editor provides you with intellisense to make working with these lifecycle hooks easier.
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters, Navigation, RoutingInstruction } from '@aurelia/router';
export class MyComponent implements IRouteableComponent {
canLoad(params: Parameters, instruction: RoutingInstruction, navigation: Navigation);
loading(params: Parameters, instruction: RoutingInstruction, navigation: Navigation);
canUnload(instruction: RoutingInstruction, navigation: Navigation);
unloading(instruction: RoutingInstruction, navigation: Navigation);
}

canLoad

The canLoad method is called upon attempting to load the component. If your route has any parameters supplied, they will be provided to the canLoad method as an object with one or more parameters as the first argument.
If you were loading data from an API based on values provided in the URL, you would most likely do that inside canLoad if the view is dependent on the data successfully loading.
The canLoad method allows you to determine if the component should be loaded or not. If your component relies on data being present from the API or other requirements being fulfilled before being allowed to render, this is the method you would use.
When working with the canLoad method, you can use promises to delay loading the view until a promise and/or promises have been resolved. The component would be loaded if we were to return true from this method.
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters } from "@aurelia/router";
export class MyProduct implements IRouteableComponent {
canLoad(params: Parameters) {
return true;
}
}

Required data

If you wanted to load data from an API, you could make the canLoad method async, which would make it a promise-based method. You would be awaiting an actual API call of some kind in place of ....load data
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters } from "@aurelia/router";
export class MyProduct implements IRouteableComponent {
async canLoad(params: Parameters) {
await ....load data (Fetch call, etc)
}
}
Unlike other async methods, if the promise does not resolve, the component will not load. The canLoad lifecycle method tells the router if the component is allowed to load. It's a great router method for components that rely on data loading such as product detail or user profile pages.

Redirecting

Not only can we allow or disallow the component to be loaded, but we can also redirect it. If you want to redirect to the root route, return a string with an / inside it. You can return a route ID, route path match or navigation instruction from inside this callback to redirect.
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters } from "@aurelia/router";
export class MyProduct implements IRouteableComponent {
canLoad(params: Parameters) {
return '/'; // Matches default empty route
}
}
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters } from "@aurelia/router";
export class MyProduct implements IRouteableComponent {
canLoad(params: Parameters) {
return 'products'; // Matches route with ID 'products'
}
}
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters } from "@aurelia/router";
export class MyProduct implements IRouteableComponent {
canLoad(params: Parameters) {
return '/products/54'; // Matches route path for product/:productId
}
}
Returning a boolean false, string or RoutingInstruction from within the canLoad function will cancel the router navigation.

loading

The loading method is called when your component is navigated to. If your route has any parameters supplied, they will be provided to the load method as an object with one or more parameters as the first argument.
If you are loading data from an API based on values provided in the URL and the rendering of this view is not dependent on the data being successfully returned, you can do that inside of load.
In many ways, the loading method is the same as canLoad with the exception that loading cannot prevent the component from loading. Where canLoad can be used to redirect users away from the component, the loading method cannot.
All of the above code examples for canLoad can be used with loading and will work the same, with exception of being able to return true or false boolean values to prevent the component being loaded (as we just mentioned).

canUnload

The canUnload method is called when a user attempts to leave a routed view. The first argument of this callback is a INavigatorInstruction it provides information about the next route. You can return a component, boolean or string value from this method.
Like the canLoad method, this is just the inverse. It determines if we can navigate away from the current component.

unloading

The unloading method is called if the user is allowed to leave and is in the process of leaving. The first argument of this callback is a INavigatorInstruction it provides information about the next route.
Like the loading method, this is just the inverse. It is called when the component is unloaded (provided canUnload wasn't false).

Loading data inside of components

A common router scenario is you want to route to a specific component, say a component that displays product information based on the ID in the URL. You request the API to get the information and display it.
Two asynchronous lifecycles are perfect for dealing with loading data: canLoad and load - both supporting returning a promise (or async/await).
If the component you are loading absolutely requires the data to exist on the server and be returned, the canLoad lifecycle method is the best place to do it. Using our example of a product page, if you couldn't load product information, the page would be useful, right?
From the inside canLoad you can redirect the user elsewhere or return false to throw an error.
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters } from "@aurelia/router";
export class MyComponent implements IRouteableComponent {
async canLoad(params: Parameters) {
this.product = await this.api.getProduct(params.productId);
}
}
Similarly, if you still want the view to load, even if we can't get the data, you would use the loadinglifecycle callback.
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters } from "@aurelia/router";
export class MyComponent implements IRouteableComponent {
async loading(params: Parameters) {
this.product = await this.api.getProduct(params.productId);
}
}
When you use load and async the component will wait for the data to load before rendering.

Getting information about the currently active route

If you worked with routing in Aurelia 1, you might be accustomed to a currentInstruction property available on the router. In Aurelia 2, this property does not exist. There are, however, two properties on the router called activeNavigation and activeComponents which can be used to achieve a similar result. You can also reference the instruction itself from within route lifecycle functions.
The activeNavigation property contains quite a few properties but most notably has the current URL path, query parameters and other navigation-specific values. You might want to get information about the current route.

Get current route details

We can get information about the current route by accessing the activeComponents array and determining the active component. Still, it is possible that more than one component will be in this array. An easier way is to get the route instruction on the canLoad and loading lifecycle methods.
import { IRouteableComponent, IRouter, Navigation, Parameters, RoutingInstruction } from '@aurelia/router';
loading(parameters: Parameters, instruction: RoutingInstruction, navigation: Navigation): void | Promise<void> {
console.log(instruction.endpoint.instance.getContent().instruction);
}
It might seem like a mouthful, but to get the current instruction that resulted in the viewport's current content, this is the current approach to take from within those aforementioned methods inside your components.

Get query parameters from the URL

The parameters object contains a Javascript object of any URL parameters. If your URL contains /?myprop=22&frag=0 then this object would contain {myprop: '22', frag: '0'} , allowing you to get fragment values.
loading() {
console.log(this.router.activeNavigation.parameters);
}

Setting the title from within components

While you would often set the title of a route in your route configuration object using the title property, sometimes you want the ability to specify the title property from within the routed component itself.
You can achieve this from within the canLoad and load methods in your component. By setting the next.title property, you can override or transform the title.
import { IRouteableComponent, Parameters, RoutingInstruction, Navigation } from "@aurelia/router";
export class ProductPage implements IRouteableComponent {
loading(parameters: Parameters, instruction: RoutingInstruction, navigation: Navigation) {
instruction.route.match.title = 'COOL BEANS';
}
}